“The Curtains Are Fucking Blue!”

Today we met agent Mark Schlegel. He told us that we are our own company, and that we must be clever. We must have a strong sense of who we are, and our monologues must serve us.

Then we split again, the general performance students went to director Carl Forsman, a complete goof-ball and font of knowledge. I have 3 pages of notes from his session today! He taught us about EPAs and guidelines to picking monologues. (13 points!)
I performed my Homebody/Kabul monologue for him, but it didn’t go well… it just felt… wrong. He told me he didn’t think it was a wise monologue choice because he didn’t see the conflict. When I was defending my choice, describing the character’s hunger for love and affection from her parents and being hungry for a world that feels instead of numbing himself, he sat back, smiled and said, “Then do that. Show that. I want to see the same frustration, the same passion you had when you explained your monologue to me.”

We met with Dani Super of Super Casting (for film and television) and learned how to nail the under 5 (under 5 lines given to you at the audition). She taught us the 3 Ps (Pacing, proximity and Punctuation). “I can elevate the text to its full potential”. She also told us that casting directors do not have much imagination, so you have to help them place you. She told us that educators teach you the craft; but coaches teach you business. Preparation, context, comprehension and tenacity are key… but she also told us not too go too far into it… sometimes, it is what it is. “The curtains are fucking blue!” she shouted.

We ran over time so we rushed over to see Clyborne Park, the new play that parallels A Raisin In the Sun. What an incredible show! I have never seen a play that was so socially necessary!!! (Especially in Memphis. Yes, I said it!)

Afterwards, we had a chance to talk to the cast. I was shocked to know that the actors did not do any table work, research, or talk about any of the issues presented in the play… I don’t know how I feel about that. I guess that is what kept the tension so alive on stage… maybe some of the actors have the opinions presented in the show. They did provide several points of advice.
* Don’t get so far into your character that you forget the play.
* Don’t e afraid to ask when you don’t understand. Nothing’s worse than faking it.
* You must be flexible, don’t marry your choices.
* Finally, it is not our job to make people think something, just our job to present.

I would love to see this play in Memphis.

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